The Rutgers–Camden Department of Fine Arts becomes a central hub for interactive, online conversations with nationally and internationally renowned artists during its “SkypeOnArt” program.  Artists who are luminaries in their fields Skype in from other parts of the country and globe. They share with us images or video shorts of their work and answer questions, and the audience really gets an opportunity to direct the discussion. Discussions have included making electricity out of mud, the nature of collage, and narrative and new trends in performance and sound.

All talks will take place at free-period (11:30 to 12:20) in Fine Arts Room 109. Everyone is invited. Feel free to bring your lunch!

Spring 2019 SkypeOnArt schedule:

Aroussiak Gabrielian and Alison B. Hirsch
Monday, February 4th

Aroussiak Gabrielian Is an architectural and landscape architectural designer with a background in visual arts. She holds an MLA and an M.Arch from the University of Pennsylvania and is currently pursuing her Ph.D in Media Arts + Practice at University of Southern California’s School Cinematic Arts where she is an Annenberg Fellow. Aroussiak deploys design methodologies that use future scenarios as tools to better understand the present and that use design as a means of speculation. 

Alison B. Hirsch is a landscape architectural designer, as well as urban historian and theorist. Currently an Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture + Urbanism at the University of Southern California’s School of Architecture, Alison holds a Ph.D. in Architecture, an MLA and an M.S. in Historic Preservation from the University of Pennsylvania. Alison’s design interests focus on public histories and politics of urban settlement, as well as how corporeality and human movement can inform the design process.

 

Eve Andree Laramee
Monday, March 4th  

Eve Andree Laramee is an installation artist whose works explores four primary themes: legacy of the atomic age, history of science, environment and ecology, social conditions. Her interdisciplinary artworks operate at the confluence of art and science. She is currently Professor and Chair of the Department of Art and Art History at Pace University. Laramee currently lives in Brooklyn, NY, and Santa Fe, NM.  She is also the founder and director of ART/MEDIA for a Nuclear Free Future. 

 

Paul Vanouse
Monday, March 11th 

Paul Vanouse is an artist working in Emerging Media forms. His artworks have included data collection devices that examine the ramifications of polling and categorization, genetic experiments that undermine scientific constructions of race and identity, and temporary organizations that playfully critique institutionalization and corporatization. These “Operational Fictions” are hybrid entities–simultaneously real things and fanciful representations–intended to resonate in the equally hyper-real context of the contemporary electronic landscape. 

 

Hannah Rogers
Monday, April 8th  

Hannah Star Rogers is a curator, scholar, and poet. She received her MFA in poetry from Columbia University and Ph.D. at Cornell University on the intersection of art and science. She curated Making Science Visible: The Photography of Berenice Abbott, which received an exhibits prize from the British Society for the History of Science and resulted in an invited lecture at the Smithsonian Archives of American Art. She is past Director of Research and Collaboration for Emerge: Artists and Scientists Redesign the Future 2016 and served as Guest Bioart Curator for 2017.



Past SkypeOnArt Lecturers:

Fall 2018 

 

Yuri Suzuki

Yuri Suzuki is a sound artist, designer and electronic musician who explores the realms of sound through exquisitely designed pieces. His work looks into the relationship between sound and people, and how music and sound effect their minds. His sound, art and installations have been exhibited all over the world.

Mattia Casalegno

Mattia Casalegno is an Italian interdisciplinary artist, live-media performer and installation artist working in a broad range of media. His multidisciplinary work is influenced by both post-conceptualism and digital art, and has been defined relational, immersive, and participatory. His practice explores the effects new media have on our societies, investigating the relationships between technology, the objects we create, our subjectivities, and the modes in which these relations unfold into each other.

Jane Philbrick

Jane Philbrick’s large-scale installations and sculpture range in media from ultrasound and rammed earth to magnetic levitation and found space. She works in collaboration across disciplines in science and engineering, architecture, music, and performance.

Pinar Yoldas

Pinar Yoldas is an infradisciplinary designer/artist/researcher currently based in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Her work develops within biological sciences and digital technologies through architectural installations, kinetic sculpture, sound, video and drawing with a focus on post-humanism, eco-nihilism, anthropocene and feminist technoscience.

 


Joyce Kozloff

Joyce Kozloff has been an artist and activist for decades, from her involvement with the 1970s feminist collective Heresies to her more recent commitment to We Make America, a group of artists creating Statue of Liberty-inspired props and signage for numerous protests against Trump. In her latest exhibition, Girlhood, at D.C. Moore Gallery,  Kozloff juxtaposes her adult obsession with antiquated cartography with her own childhood drawings for social studies projects,  revealing the limits of  our ability to comprehend “new worlds,”  both historically and personally.

Natalie Bookchin

Natalie Bookchin is an artist and filmmaker who, through virtuosic editing and innovative sonic and visual montage, interrogates the American crisis and its increased inequality and polarization as well as the seismic impact of the digital tools and platforms that determine the shape and texture of contemporary life. Her critically acclaimed films and installations have shown around the world at museums, galleries, theaters, and festivals, including at MoMA, LACMA, PS1, Mass MOCA, the Walker Art Center, the Pompidou Centre, MOCA LA, the Whitney Museum, the Tate, and Creative Time. She has received numerous grants and awards, including from Creative Capital, California Arts Council, the Guggenheim Foundation, among others.

Dr. Eban Goodstein

Dr. Goodstein is the author of three books: Economics and the Environment, (John Wiley and Sons: 2017) now in its eighth edition; Fighting for Love in the Century of Extinction: How Passion and Politics Can Stop Global Warming (University Press of New England: 2007); and The Trade-off Myth: Fact and Fiction about Jobs and the Environment. (Island Press: 1999). His research has been featured in The New York Times, Scientific American, The Economist, and USA Today. In recent years, Goodstein has coordinated climate education events at over 2500 colleges, universities, high schools and other institutions across the country He serves on the editorial board of Sustainability: The Journal of Record, and is on the Steering Committee of Economics for Equity & the Environment.

Nina Katchadourian

Nina Katchadourian is an interdisciplinary artist whose work includes video, performance, sound, sculpture, photography and public projects. Her video Accent Elimination was included at the 2015 Venice Biennale in the Armenian pavilion, which won the Golden Lion for Best National Participation. She lives and works in Brooklyn, and is an associate professor on the faculty of NYU Gallatin. She is represented by Catharine Clark gallery.

Carlos Castellanos

Carlos Castellanos is an interdisciplinary artist and researcher with a wide array of interests such as cybernetics, ecology, embodiment, phenomenology, artificial intelligence and art-science collaboration. He holds a Ph.D. from the School of Interactive Arts and Technology (SIAT), Simon Fraser University and an MFA from the CADRE Laboratory for New Media, San Jose State University.